Category Archives: Original Research

Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Residents’ Perception of Simulation Training in Four Romanian Centres

DOI: 10.1515/jccm-2017-0005

Introduction: Simulation training offers an opportunity to educate anaesthesia and intensive care (AIC) residents safely. At present, it is not yet a mandatory part of residency curriculum.
The aim of the study was to evaluate the residents’ perception of the inclusion of simulation-based training in the Romanian AIC residency program.
Material and methods: Romanian AICs in anaesthesia and intensive care from four training centres completed a twenty-question survey regarding their views on simulation during their residency training. Residents were divided into junior, in the first three years, or senior groups, in the last two years of residency training. The questionnaire included Likert-scale multiple-choice, open-ended, and “yes” or “no” questions regarding simulator learning, the frequency of simulation sessions, and the value of the simulation sessions in improving practice, skills or teamwork. The open-ended questions, asked which were the respondents’ preferred topics to be included in simulation sessions.
Results: Fifty-six percent of residents completed and returned the questionnaire. Ninety-eight percent of them considered simulation-learning useful once a month or every three months especially in the first two years of training. All residents thought simulation sessions would improve their skills, communication abilities, and teamwork. Senior residents paid more attention to clinical scenarios (p=0.007), haemodynamic monitoring (p=0.017) and mechanical ventilation (p=0.004) as compared to juniors. All residents considered difficult airway management, and cardiac life support to be very important issues to be included in simulation sessions.
Conclusion: The survey demonstrated that simulation-based training should play a greater role and eventually became compulsory in training program in AIC academic centres.

Supplementary material

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Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin as a Marker for Renal Dysfunction Detection in Critically Ill Patients with Increased Intraabdominal Pressure

DOI: 10.1515/jccm-2017-0006

Introduction: Elevated intraabdominal pressure (IAP) it is known to have an impact on renal function trough the pressure transmitted from the abdominal cavity to the vasculature responsible for the renal blood flow. Intraabdominal pressure is found to be frequent in intensive care patients and also to be a predictor of mortality. Intra- abdominal high pressure is an entity that can have serious impact on intensive care admitted patients, studies concluding that if this condition progresses to abdominal compartment syndrome mortality is as high as 80%.
Aim: The aim of this study was to observe if a link between increased intraabdominal pressure and modification in renal function exists (NGAL, creatinine clearance).
Material and Method: The study enrolled 30 critically ill patients admitted in the Intensive Care Unit of SCJU Tîrgu Mures between November 2015 and August 2016. The study enrolled adult, hemodynamically stable patients admitted in intensive critical care – defined by a normal blood pressure maintained without any vasopressor or inotropic support, invasive monitoring using PICCO device and abdominal pressure monitoring.
Results: The patients were divided into two groups based on the intraabdominal pressure values: normal intraabdominal pressure group= 52 values and increased intraabdominal group= 35 values. We compared the groups in the light of NGAL values, 24 hours diuresis, GFR and creatinine clearance. The groups are significantly different when compared in the light of NGAL values and GFR values. We obtained a statistically significant correlation between NGAL value and 24 hour diuresis. No other significant correlations were encountered between the studied items.
Conclusions: NGAL values are increased in patients with high intraabdominal pressure which may suggest its utility as a cut off marker for patients with increased intraabdominal pressure. There is a significant decreased GFR in patient with elevated intraabdominal pressure, observation which can help in early detection of renal injury in patients due to high intraabdominal pressure. No correlation was found between creatinine clearance and increased intraabdominal pressure.

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Pulse Oximetry During the First 24 Hours as a Screening Tool For Congenital Heart Defects

DOI: 10.1515/jccm-2017-0004

Introduction: Although screening for congenital heart defects (CHD) relies mainly on antenatal ultrasonography and clinical examination after birth, life-threatening cardiac malformations are often not diagnosed before the patient is discharged.
Aim: To assess the use of routine pulse oximetry in the delivery room and at 24 hours postpartum, and to study its feasibility as a screening test for CHD.
Material and Methods: In this prospective study, all infants born in “Cuza Voda” Maternity Hospital, Iasi, Romania, were enrolled over a thirteen-month period. Preductal oximetry was assessed during the first hour, and postductal oximetry was evaluated at twenty-four hours postpartum. Data were then analyzed to establish the sensitivity and specificity of pulse oximetry, as a screening test for CHD.
Results: 5406 infants were included in the study, with a mean gestational age of 38.2 weeks and a mean birth weight of 3175 grams. During the first minute, blood oxygen saturation varied between 40% and 90% and at 24 hours of life, it ranged between 90% and 100%. Following oximetry assessment, 14 infants with critical CHD were identified. Blood oxygen saturation values in infants with CHD were lower throughout the entire period of evaluation. Pulse oximetry had good sensitivity and specificity at 1 hour (Se=87.5%, Sp=95.5%) and 24 hours (Se=92.5%, Sp=97.4%) for the diagnosis of CHD. Blood oxygen saturation values at one minute, 1 hour and 24 hours are strong discriminative parameters for the early diagnosis of CHD.
Conclusion: Routine pulse oximetry during the first 24 hours postpartum represents an early indicator of CHD to facilitate timely intervention. Pulse oximetry provides excellent sensitivity and specificity and has tremendous potential as a standard screening test for CHD during the first 24 hours of life.

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Congenital Heart Disease Requiring Maintenance of Ductus Arteriosus in Critically Ill Newborns Admitted at a Tertiary Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

DOI: 10.1515/jccm-2016-0031

Introduction: Congenital heart diseases (CHD) have been reported to be responsible for 30 to 50% of infant mortality caused by congenital disabilities. In critical cases, survival of newborns with CHD depends on the patency of the ductus arteriosus (PDA), for maintaining the systemic or pulmonary circulation. The aim of the study was to assess the efficacy and side effects of PGE (prostaglandin E) administration in newborns with critical congenital heart disease requiring maintenance of the ductus arteriosus.
Material and method: All clinical and paraclinical data of 66 infants admitted to one referral tertiary level academic center and treated with Alprostadil were analyzed. Patients were divided into three groups: Group 1: PDA dependent pulmonary circulation (n=11) Group 2: PDA dependent systemic circulation (n=31) Group 3: PDA depending mixed circulation (n=24)
Results: The mean age of starting PGE1 treatment was 2.06 days, 1.91 (+/-1.44) days for PDA depending pulmonary flow, 2.39 (+/-1.62) days for PDA depending systemic flow and 1.71 (+/1.12) for PDA depending mixing circulation. PEG1 initiation was commenced 48 hours after admission for 72%, between 48-72 hours for 6%, and after 72 to 120 hours for 21% of newborns detected with PDA dependent circulation. Before PEG1 initiation the mean initial SpO2 was 77.89 (+/- 9.2)% and mean initial oxygen pressure (PaO2) was 26.96(+/-6.45) mmHg. At the point when stable wide open PDA was achieved their mean SpO2increased to 89.73 (+/-8.4)%, and PaO2 rose to 49 (+/-7.2) mmHg. During PGE1 treatment, eleven infants (16.7%) had apnea attacks, five children (7.5%) had convulsions, 33 (50%) had fever, 47 (71.2%) had leukocytosis, 52 (78.8%) had edema, 25.8% had gastrointestinal intolerance, 45.5% had hypokalemia, and 63.6% had irritability.
Conclusions: For those infants with severe cyanosis or shock caused by PDA dependent heart lesions, the initiation and maintenance of PGE1 infusion is imperative. The side effects of this beneficial therapy were transient and treatable.

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Persistent Ductus Arteriosus in Critically Ill Preterm Infants

DOI: 10.1515/jccm-2016-0026

Introduction: Persistent ductus arteriosus (PDA) is found with increased incidence in preterm infants, significantly affecting neonatal morbidity and mortality rates.
Aim: To evaluate the association between the presence of PDA and the severity of clinical condition at birth in critically ill preterm infants, with gestational ages (GA) ≤ 32 weeks and severe respiratory distress.
Methods: All preterm infants with GA ≤ 32 weeks admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of the Clinical County Emergency Hospital, Sibiu between 1 January 2010 and 31 December 2015 were included in the study. These were categorized as Group 1 [Preterm infants with PDA; n=154] and Group 2 [Preterm infants without PDA; n=186]. Epidemiological and clinical data were collected in the National Registry for Respiratory Distress Syndrome for all children, and data related to prenatal period, clinical characteristics at birth i.e GA, weight, gender, Apgar scores, and clinical features such as resuscitation at birth, surfactant administration, need and duration of respiratory support, neonatal sepsis, complications associated with prematurity, and death, were analyzed.
Results: Group 1 infants had significantly lower GA and birth weights, were more often out born (p=0.049, HR 1.69), and had significantly lower Apgar scores at 1 and 10 minutes (p=0.022, p=0.000). They presented a significantly higher need for surfactant administration (42.9% vs 24.7%, p<0.0001) and respiratory support (96.8% vs 90.3%, HR 3.19, p=0.019 for need of CPAP and 22.1% vs 10.8%, HR 2.35, p=0.004 for mechanical ventilation). Duration of respiratory support was also significantly higher in the Group 1 (7.6%±7.5 vs. 5.1±3.8 days, p<0.0001 for CPAP and 20.1±22.5 vs. 12.0±15.7 days, p<0.0001 for mechanical ventilation).
Conclusion: In very preterm infants, PDA may be associated with a critical clinical condition leading to serious complications. The presence of PDA after the seventh day of life was associated with an increased need for respiratory support, both CPAP and mechanical ventilation, increased severity of the respiratory distress syndrome, requiring a longer duration of respiratory support, and increased the hospitalization length. In very preterm infants, PDA presence was also associated with a higher rate of severe complications and death, indicating the need for a careful and proper management of these critical cases in neonatal intensive care units.

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Can APACHE II, SOFA, ISS, and RTS Severity Scores be Used to Predict Septic Complications in Multiple Trauma Patients?

DOI: 10.1515/jccm-2016-0019

Background: Physiological composite scores are used to predict mortality in multiple trauma patients. Sepsis is the leading cause of late mortality in trauma victims brought about by immune suppression due to homeostasis dysregulation.
Objective: To determine whether APACHE II, SOFA, ISS and RTS scores can predict the occurrence of sepsis in multiple trauma patients.
Methods: APACHE II, SOFA, ISS, and RTS scores were calculated during the first twenty-four hours after the injury for sixty-four adult poly-traumatic patients. The occurrence of infectious complications was investigated over a fourteen-day period. The infection-free rates for the multiple trauma patients were considered as end-points in the Kaplan-Meier plot analysis.
Results: For SOFA, a cutoff score of 4 points was identified as a predictor of the occurrence of sepsis, with 89% of the patients with SOFA<4 being infection-free, while 37% of those with SOFA>4 were infection-free (p<0.01). None of the patients with APACHE II≤5 points developed infections. Eighty-four percent of patients with APACHE II scores of 5-10 did not develop sepsis, while 49% with APACHE II≥11 were infection-free (p<0.01).  A cutoff of 7 points was found to be most discriminative for RTS. Eighty-eight percent of the patients with RTS≥7 and 43% of those with RTS<7 were infection-free (p<0.01). Eighty-eight percent of patients with ISS<22 did not develop sepsis and 56% with ISS≥22 did not develop sepsis (p<0.01).
Conclusion: APACHE II, SOFA, ISS, and RTS functional severity scores can predict mortality as well as the occurrence of sepsis in multiple trauma patients.

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Influence of Ventilation Parameters on Intraabdominal Pressure

DOI: 10.1515/jccm-2016-0016

Introduction: Intraabdominal pressure monitoring is not routinely performed because the procedure assumes some invasiveness and, like other invasive procedures, it needs to have a clear indication to be performed. The causes of IAH are various. Mechanically ventilated patients have numerous parameters set in order to be optimally ventilated and it is important to identify the ones with the biggest interference in abdominal pressure. Although it was stated that mechanical ventilation is a potential factor of high intraabdominal pressure the set parameters which may lead to this diagnostic are not clearly named.
Objectives: To evaluate the relation between intraabdominal pressure and ventilator parameters in patients with mechanical ventilation and to determine the correlation between intraabdominal pressure and body mass index.
Material and method: This is an observational study which enrolled 16 invasive ventilated patients from which we obtained 61 record sheets. The following parameters were recorded twice daily: ventilator parameters, intraabdominal pressure, SpO2, Partial Oxygen pressure of arterial blood. We calculated the Body Mass Index (BMI) for each patient and the volume tidal/body weight ratio for every recorded data point.
Results: We observed a significant correlation between intraabdominal pressure (IAP) and the value of PEEP (p=0.0006). A significant statistical correlation was noted regarding the tidal volumes used for patient ventilation. The mean tidal volume was 5.18 ml/kg. Another significant correlation was noted between IAP and tidal volume per kilogram (p=0.0022). A positive correlation was found between BMI and IAP (p=0.0049), and another one related to the age of the enrolled patients. (p=0.0045).
Conclusions: The use of positive end-expiratory pressures and high tidal volumes during mechanical ventilation may lead to the elevation of intraabdominal pressure, a possible way of reducing this risk would be using low values of PEEP and also low volumes for the setting of ventilation parameters. There is a close positive correlation between the intraabdominal pressure levels and body mass index.

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Intubation-Surfactant: Extubation on Continuous Positive Pressure Ventilation. Who Are the Best Candidates?

DOI: 10.1515/jccm-2016-0010

Introduction: Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) continues to be the leading cause of illness and death in preterm infants. Studies indicate that INSURE strategy (INtubate-SURfactant administration and Extubate to nasal continuous positive airway pressure [nCPAP]) is better than mechanical ventilation (MV) with rescue surfactant, for the management of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in very low birth weight (VLBW) neonates, as it has a synergistic effect on alveolar stability.
Aim of the study: To identify the factors associated with INSURE strategy failure in preterm infants with gestational age (GA) ≤ 32 weeks.
Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study, based on data collected in the Romanian National Registry for RDS patients by three regional (level III) centers between 01.01.2010 and 31.12.2011. All preterm infants of ≤ 32 weeks GA were included. Prenatal and neonatal information were compared between (Group 1), the preterm infants successfully treated using INtubation-SURfactant-Extubation on nasal CPAP (INSURE) strategy and (Group 2 ), those who needed mechanical ventilation within seventy-two hours after INSURE.
Results: A total of 637 preterm infants with GA ≤ 32 weeks were included in the study. INSURE strategy was performed in fifty-seven cases (8.9%) [ Group 1] and was successful in thirty-one patients (54.4%). No differences were found as regards the studied prenatal and intranatal characteristics between (Group 1) and Group 2 who needed mechanical ventilation. Group 2 preterm infants who needed mechanical ventilation within 72 hours after INSURE had significantly lower mean Apgar scores at 1 and 5 minutes and lower peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2) during resuscitation at birth (p<0.05). Successful INSURE strategy was associated with greater GA, birth weight (BW), fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) during resuscitation, and an increased mean dose of surfactant but these associations were not statistically significant (p>0.5).
Conclusion: In preterm infants ≤ 32 weeks gestation, increased INSURE failure rates are associated with complicated pregnancies, significantly lower Apgar scores at 1 and 5 minutes, and lower peripheral oxygen saturation during resuscitation.

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Total Intravenous Versus Inhalation Anesthesia in Patients Undergoing Laparoscopic Cholecystectomies. Effects on Two Proinflammatory Cytokines Serum Levels: Il-32 and TNF-Alfa.

DOI: 10.1515/jccm-2016-0008

Introduction: It has been reported that as compared with total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA), inhalation anesthesia is increasing the postoperative level of proinflammatory interleukins.
The aim of the study is to investigate if there is an in-vivo relationship between proinflammatory cytokines, Interleukin-32 (IL-32) and Tumour necrosis factor – α (TNF- α), in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomies with two different anesthetic techniques, TIVA or inhalation anesthesia.
Material and Methods: Twenty two consecutive patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomies were prospectively randomized into two groups: Group 1: TIVA with target-controlled infusion (TIVA-TCI) (n=11) and Group 2: isoflurane anesthesia (ISO) (n=11). IL-32 and TNF-α were determined before the induction of anesthesia (T1), before incision (T2) and at 2h (T3) and 24h (T4) postoperatively. Our primary outcome was to compare plasma levels of IL-32 and TNF- α concentrations (expressed as area-under-the-curve) over 24 hours between study groups. Our secondary outcome was to establish whether there is a correlation between plasma levels of IL-32 and of TNF-α at each time point between the two groups.
Results: Area-under-the-curve (AUC) of IL-32 plasma concentration was 7.53 in Group 1 (TIVA) versus 3.80 in Group 2 (ISO), p= 1. For TNF-α, AUC of plasma concentration was 733.9 in Group 1 (TIVA) and 668.7 in Group 2 (ISO), p= 0.066. There were no significant differences in plasma concentrations of both IL-32 and TNF- α between the groups.
Conclusions: IL-32 expression in response to minor surgery is very low. There were no significant difference between plasma levels ofTNF- α and IL-32 after TIVA versus inhalation anesthesia during the first 24 hours postoperatively. Further studies are needed on larger groups to investigate whether there can be a correlation between these interleukins after 2 different anesthetic techniques and the impact of this correlation on postoperative outcome.

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Factors Favouring the Development of Clostridium Difficile Infection in Critically Ill Patients

DOI: 10.1515/jccm-2016-0006

Clostridium difficile, an anaerobic, spore-forming, toxin-forming, gram-positive bacillus present in the bacterial flora of the colon is the principal cause of nosocomial diarrhoea in adults.
Aim: Assessment of favouring factors of Clostridium difficile infections as well as the interactions between them, in critically ill hospitalized patients undergoing complex medical and surgical treatments.
Material and Methods: A retrospective case-control study involving eighty patients admitted in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of the County Clinical Emergency Hospital Tîrgu-Mureş was conducted between January and October 2014. Patients aged eighteen years and over, who had undergone complex medical and surgical treatment, were divided into two subgroups. Group 1 included patients who developed diarrhoea but were not diagnosed as having a Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). Group 2 included patients who developed diarrhoea due to CDI as indicated by a positive culture and the expression of exotoxin. The assessed parameters were age, length of stay (LOS), antibiotic spectrum, association with proton pump inhibitors (PPI) or H2-receptor antagonists, immunological status, the presence or lack of gastrointestinal tract surgery.
Results: The mean age was 64.6 years with an average LOS of 10 days. Fifty-six percent of patients came to the ICU from internal medicine wards and forty-three percent from surgical wards. 20.5% of them were immunosuppressed. Co-association of ceftriaxone and pantoprazole significantly increased the risk of CDI compared to co-administration of any other antibiotic or pantoprazole (p=0.01). The odds ratio for Pantoprazole together with any antibiotic versus antibiotic therapy alone was significantly higher (p=0.018) with a sevenfold increase in the risk of positive exotoxin increase.
Conclusions: Antibiotic use is associated with “no risk to develop CDI” in the first five days of administration. PPIs associated therapy increased the risk of CDI in first seventy-two hours regardless of the antibiotic type, and contributes to an active expression of CD exotoxin.

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