Category Archives: JCCM 2021, Vol. 7, Issue 1

Effects of Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Initiation on Oxygenation and Pulmonary Opacities

DOI: 10.2478/jccm-2020-0040

Introduction: There is limited data on the impact of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) on pulmonary physiology and imaging in adult patients. The current study sought to evaluate the serial changes in oxygenation and pulmonary opacities after ECMO initiation.
Methods: Records of patients started on veno-venous, or veno-arterial ECMO were reviewed (n=33; mean (SD): age 50(16) years; Male: Female 20:13). Clinical and laboratory variables before and after ECMO, including daily PaO2 to FiO2 ratio (PFR), were recorded. Daily chest radiographs (CXR) were prospectively appraised in a blinded fashion and scored for the extent and severity of opacities using an objective scoring system.
Results: ECMO was associated with impaired oxygenation as reflected by the drop in median PFR from 101 (interquartile range, IQR: 63-151) at the initiation of ECMO to a post-ECMO trough of 74 (IQR: 56-98) on post-ECMO day 5. However, the difference was not statistically significant. The appraisal of daily CXR revealed progressively worsening opacities, as reflected by a significant increase in the opacity score (Wilk’s Lambda statistic 7.59, p=0.001). During the post-ECMO period, a >10% increase in the opacity score was recorded in 93.9% of patients. There was a negative association between PFR and opacity scores, with an average one-unit decrease in the PFR corresponding to a +0.010 increase in the opacity score (95% confidence interval: 0.002 to 0.019, p-value=0.0162). The median opacity score on each day after ECMO initiation remained significantly higher than the pre-ECMO score. The most significant increase in the opacity score (9, IQR: -8 to 16) was noted on radiographs between pre-ECMO and forty-eight hours post-ECMO. The severity of deteriorating oxygenation or pulmonary opacities was not associated with hospital survival.
Conclusions: The use of ECMO is associated with an increase in bilateral opacities and a deterioration in oxygenation that starts early and peaks around 48 hours after ECMO initiation.

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Reflections on a Year of SARS-CoV-2

DOI: 10.2478/jccm-2021-0005

As we are writing this editorial 12 months following the publication of “The 2019 Novel Coronavirus: A Crown Jewel of Pandemics?”, there are 96 million cases with over 2 million total deaths, a public health tragedy of staggering proportions [1]. The early stages of the pandemic were characterized by scientific uncertainty, with many authors postulating hypotheses about the transmission of SARS-CoV-2, the appropriate medical treatment, and the most effective public health measures. In retrospect, many of the early takes on coronavirus ended up being incorrect. Since January 2020, science has advanced at a breathtaking pace and the disease caused by SARS-CoV-2 has taken on dimensions few of us anticipated. In this piece, we aim to reflect on the last year, discussing aspects of the pandemic that the scientific community correctly anticipated, and highlighting where we went wrong. [More]

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